Pete Buttigieg Unveils New Auto Manufacturing Rules to Prevent Rear-Ending

Pete Buttigieg Rear End 01


The U.S. has unveiled new rules for auto manufacturers, requiring all new cars to be fitted with automatic emergency braking (AEB).

“We have a crisis of roadway deaths in this country—and today we’re taking a major step toward addressing this with our new rule on automatic emergency braking,” said Department of Transport (DOT) Secretary Pete Buttigieg on X.

We have a crisis of roadway deaths in this country—and today we’re taking a major step toward addressing this with our new rule on automatic emergency braking. pic.twitter.com/NRS8WJeA6o

— Secretary Pete Buttigieg (@SecretaryPete) April 30, 2024

The DOT’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) announced the new rules on Monday, claiming that they will save lives and prevent thousands of injuries each year.

Advanced AEB systems will automatically apply the brakes if the car detects that it is likely to crash into another vehicle or pedestrian.

The NHTSA claims that the new rules will prevent 360 deaths and roughly 24,000 injuries every year.

Although many new cars already implement some level of AEB system, the new rules requires more advanced systems than are present in most new cars.

Currently, most AEB systems are only effective at “city speeds” successfully stopping the majority of rear-end crashes at 30 miles per hour or below, but failing above 40.

The new rules would require the systems to be effective at speeds up to 62 mph, and would also require the systems to detect pedestrians in low-light environments.

The NHTSA does not expect the new rule to impose an unnecessary burden on the auto industry.

“Most new vehicles already come with AEB, and we expect that many cars and light trucks will be able to meet this standard ahead of the deadline, meaning even more lives will be saved thanks to this technology,” said NHTSA Deputy Administrator Sophie Shulman.

The new rules come as a result of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law from 2021, which instructed the DOT to develop rules for the universal implementation of AEB systems.

It is unclear whether the manufacturers or authorities will be able to access the systems remotely.





This article was originally published by a www.themainewire.com

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