Interactive: Seaborne trade in Russian oil under G7 price cap

030724 interactive seaborne russian crude exports g7 price cap


Russia, one of the world’s largest oil suppliers, has increasingly turned to non-Western firms to transport its crude to overseas buyers during its ongoing war with Ukraine.

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With a dual goal of undermining Russia’s war chest without creating significant disruptions to global supplies amid inflation pressure, G7 countries and their allies have banned tanker operators, insurers and other services firms from facilitating seaborne Russian crude exports unless the barrels are sold for no more than $60/b.

The price cap regime, which came into force Dec. 5, 2022, does not directly cover tankers flagged, owned and operated by companies outside the G7, the EU, Australia, Switzerland and Norway, and not insured by Western protection and indemnity clubs.

While such ships tend to be older and less maintained, their share in Russia’s crude exports market has been rising in recent months amid strengthening prices of Urals — the OPEC+ member’s flagship crude grade — and tightening sanctions enforcement by the West.

Non-price-capped tankers have a larger market share in shipping Russia’s Pacific crude exports, according to analysis of S&P Global Commodities at Sea and Maritime Intelligence Risk Suite data. Crudes such as Sokol, Sakhalin Blend, and Eastern Siberia–Pacific Ocean grades are more often involved in these trades than Russian barrels from Baltic or Black Sea ports like Urals.

Tanker operators in Greece, Europe’s top shipowning nation, managed to keep their traditionally strong market position in Russia in the first few months since the price cap took effect before giving ways to their peers in the UAE, Russia, China and Hong Kong.

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(Latest update: April 5, 2024)



This article was originally published by a www.spglobal.com

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